Thursday, April 15, 2010

Dead Dogs

Boston Review — Colin Dayan: Dead Dogs

Wow! A seriously deep article. Maybe it is just my reading of it, filtered through a bit of historical knowledge, such as the roots of the social service industry in the Progressive Era and the propensity of the State for murder on a grand scale, the indepth research I've done revealing zealous, patronizing, child protection professionals who so often mask their almost innate sense of superiority, their cruelty and contempt with pseudo-humanitarianism... A chilling article. Well done and worth the time to read it and think about it.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Very good article. We have a similar ban against pitbulls in my neck of the woods, and it has always confounded me. I've had the opportunity to make friends with several pitbulls, and they were such lovely dogs. I used to petsit for a lady who had 7-8 cats and 4 dogs. One of the dogs was a very sweet, docile pit bull. I mean this dog was the very antithesis of the aggressor. So sweet and loving. I have a good friend who has a mixed pit bull/some other breed. This dog has never once, not ever, shown a violent streak. Lucy's only flaw is that she is hyper in her desire to love everyone she comes into contact with. I have an acquaitance who owns a pitbull and her dog is yet another example of sweetness personified on four legs. All of this begs the question as to why the State, or those acting on its behalf, have the right to commit such horrid acts of moral putridity? Indeed, the human corollary is dead on and truly disturbing.
Thanks for the great article, Sharon....

Sharon Secor said...

I had a Great Dane that was aggressively friendly. I'll never forget the sight of him towering over this lady, up on his hind legs, just desperate for a hug and a kiss, Dane drool hanging, swinging dangerously close to her expensive fur coat. Still a puppy, he just loved people, and so accustomed to being admired by passersby, he just assumed if somebody wasn't aching to pet him, they just didn't see him. Having had Danes herself, the lady -- a complete stranger -- was remarkably graceful about it, LOL, and gave him good pets once he calmed his excited self down enough to sit.

The more you read, both history and current lines of thought in social work and most other programs for the "benefit" of the "disadvantaged" the more you feel the spot on human corollary, deep in the uneasy pit of your stomach.

Thanks for your time in reading and commenting. Always a pleasure to hear from you, and please do forgive the delay in my reply. Been crazy busy around here these days.

Best Regards...